The Heart In Harmony and Disease

December 19, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

The Fire Element rules the heart and small intestine. In Chinese healing tradition,the heart includes not only the organ itself but also the concept—shared by Western people —of the heart as a mental/emotional center, reflected in our phrases: “Have a heart!”, “Put you heart into it!”, or “Learn by heart.” Dean Ornish, M.D., heart specialist at the University of California at San Francisco, has developed from his experience a a similar awareness: “I think the mind is where heart disease begins for many people.” The Romanized word for heart in China is xin, which is often translated as “heart-mind.” Thus, according to the Chinese medical definition, the heart not only regulates blood circulation by also controls consciousness, spirit, sleep, memory, and houses the mind. In this way the heart, together with the liver, is related to the nervous system and brain. The advantage of using this expanded definition is that it accords with reality—the heart acupuncture meridian affects both the physical heart and the mind. It is well-known that emotions affect the actual functioning of the heart, seen in the speed and strength of the pulses. We will refer to the various aspects of this expanded “heart-mind” definition as appropriate.
The heart in harmony: Those with healthy hearts are genuinely friendly. They are also humble, not out of convention but because they actually feel small in comparison to the wonders they perceive with their open hearts and aware minds. Clarity is a central attribute of those with a harmonious heart-mind. They seem to see effortlessly through problems to arrive at brilliant solutions.

The Bonding Touch

December 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

Research has shown that physical contact for an animal who is emotionally attached to a human being is as rewarding as being given a morsel of favorite food. However, not all cats enjoy being touched. Touch-shyness, or the fear of being touched in one area of the body, such as the head or lower back, can be a sigh of sickness. Or it can be the result of improper handling in early life. By “improper handling.” I don’t necessarily mean that the animal was abused. It’s possible that the animal simply was not around people during its first few critical weeks of life-the time of developing, emotional attachments. This early attachment is called “bonding.”

The Bonding Touch

December 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

Research has shown that physical contact for an animal who is emotionally attached to a human being is as rewarding as being given a morsel of favorite food. However, not all cats enjoy being touched. Touch-shyness, or the fear of being touched in one area of the body, such as the head or lower back, can be a sigh of sickness. Or it can be the result of improper handling in early life. By “improper handling.” I don’t necessarily mean that the animal was abused. It’s possible that the animal simply was not around people during its first few critical weeks of life-the time of developing, emotional attachments. This early attachment is called “bonding.”

December 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

The eyeballs are tightly anchored in sockets of protective bone, and tension from the eyelids holds them in place. But a blow to the head or a fight with another animal can cause a cat’s or dogs eye to pop out. This is especially common in flat-faced dogs such as pekingese and Shih Tzus because their eye sockets are so shallow. A displaced eyeball looks awful-it usually remains attached and just protrudes, although trauma such as a car accident can force it out so it lies upon the cheek-but it isn’t life-threatening.

Protect the injured eye. An eye that’s out of the socket must be treated by a veterinarian. Before leaving the house, place a gauze pad or lint-free cloth that’s been soaked with lukewarm sterile saline.

BRUSH*BRUSH*BRUSH*

December 3, 2014 by  
Filed under Blog

Reduce tartar build up by brushing or wiping the gum line daily. Chewing on raw bones, bully sticks, toys also help reduce tartar build up. Noticing a brown film on your dog or cats teeth? Look in your pets mouth often to prevent gum issues that may cause health issues.

Next Page »